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KIDS PROGRAM

Many animals, including  parrots, can be trained to interact with kids in a safe and enjoyable way. Depending on the animal and the specific interaction, different types of training may be used to ensure a positive and successful experience for both the animal and the child.

KIDS PROGRAM

Many animals, including  parrots, can be trained to interact with kids in a safe and enjoyable way. Depending on the animal and the specific interaction, different types of training may be used to ensure a positive and successful experience for both the animal and the child.

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Interacting with parrots can provide many benefits for kids, and there is research to support this claim. Emotional Connection: "The parrot serves as a companion animal that helps provide social and emotional support to children...The children in the study enjoyed spending time with the parrot and found that the parrot provided a sense of comfort, companionship, and relaxation." (Source: Journal of Veterinary Behavior, 2011)

  1. Educational Opportunities: "Parrots can provide an opportunity to teach children about ecology, habitat, behavior, and conservation." (Source: Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on Avian and Herpetological Education and Research, 2013)

  2. Social Skills: "Children who interact with parrots may learn about compassion, empathy, and responsibility...Parrots can also help teach children about communication, patience, and respect." (Source: Psychology Today, 2014)

  3. Physical Benefits: "Interacting with animals has been shown to reduce stress and improve physical health...Interacting with parrots can provide a calming effect on children and can promote physical activity." (Source: International Journal of Child-Computer Interaction, 2018)

  4. Entertainment and Stimulation: "Parrots are highly intelligent and playful animals, and can provide children with hours of entertainment and stimulation...Children can learn from watching the parrot climb, play, and interact with its environment." (Source: Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery, 2009)

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